Sunday, June 2, 2013

Ginkgo Biloba, Dr. Oz, and Memory

On his Friday May 31, 2013 show, Dr. Oz stated emphatically that there is no conclusive evidence that Ginkgo Biloba in supplement form helps or hurts. He cited recent animal studies that suggest Ginkgo may cause certain types of cancer, but they were only studies in rats and mice. He stated that there are other studies that suggest benefits. His conclusion based on consulting his "experts" was that one is better off not taking it.

Is this news? Not to Steven Novella, MD, an American clinical neurologist and assistant professor at Yale University School of Medicine, who appeared on the April 26, 2011 episode of the Dr. Oz Show and argued this very point. Dr. Novella stated during that episode that the evidence to support the use of Ginkgo Biloba was inconclusive and Dr. Oz pushed back. (See http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/alternative-medicine-controversy-pt-1)

As I wrote in my last blog about other supplements and you may have just seen at the link above, Dr. Oz hasn't always been so neutral about recommending Ginkgo.

Still not convinced?

Check out the following links to see for yourself.

Here's a video I plucked today from his website that shows another previous episode of his show.

http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/does-it-work-ginkgo-biloba

Want more?

Here's a quote from a website called Realage.com in which he has an ownership stake:

RealAge answered:
The ginkgo tree, also known as the maidenhair tree, is one of the oldest living species in the world. This hardy, deciduous tree is cultivated on plantations in many parts of the world, primarily in the United States and China. Ginkgo leaves are picked, dried and extracted to manufacture ginkgo products, which are marketed widely.

Extracts of Ginkgo biloba can be used to treat the following:
  • limping due to insufficient peripheral blood flow (disorders of peripheral circulation, or intermittent claudication)
  • memory loss due to general mental deterioration (dementia) or physical disorders that cause a decrease in mental function (organic brain syndrome)
  • dizziness (vertigo) and ringing in the ears (tinnitus), originating from insufficient blood supply to the inner ear"
Still hungry for proof?

Here's another quote from Sharecare.com, a website he jointly owns and which purchased Realage.com.

"What are the benefits of Ginkgo Biloba?
Dr. Mehmet Oz answered:
Ginkgo biloba improves mood and can help prevent macular degeneration.Watch the video to find out from Dr. Oz about the other benefits of ginkgo biloba."
I can't make this stuff up. Dr. Oz is sowing a great deal of confusion by stating one thing one day and flipping on it the next. The worse part, he doesn't bother to clean upon the web and his own site of the old "wrong" information he previously shared. It's obvious he's not taking anything for memory. He must also think his audience also has a poor memory and can't remember what he previously said.

I wonder if we all wouldn't be better off if Dr. Oz just kept his mouth shut? What do you think?

As for Ginkgo Biloba for memory, forget it.

2 comments:

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  2. The actual seed products and also actually leaves through the tree called your ginkgo biloba utilized for many people medical reasons. Ginkgo biloba can be an natural health supplement.

    Ginkgo Biloba

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